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Honduras, State Dept: Finally, Reporter Asks Question that Should Have Been Posed 100 Days Ago

October 9, 2009

Below is another insane, stream-of-conciousness press briefing given by State Dept. spokesman, Ian Kelly.  The last question of the day is the one that could have been posed back in early July to the Obama (just got a Nobel Peace Prize) administration.  After a collective review of Ian Kelly’s press briefings, I think he should get a prize of some kind for pretending to be an idiot in order to cover the most consistent lying about Honduras within this administration. 

QUESTION: Ian, this has been dragging on for so long. Why are we not to draw the conclusion that it’s dragging on because the U.S. won’t do anything – really do anything about this because there is significant support for the members of the coup, business connections with the United States, conservative organizations that support the coup that do not like Zelaya. So why are we not supposed to, you know, draw some conclusion that it’s simply foot-dragging on the part of this Administration?

 

  

 

Daily Press Briefings : Daily Press Briefing – October 8
Thu, 08 Oct 2009 16:35:00 -0500

Ian Kelly
Department Spokesman
Daily Press Briefing
Washington, DC
October 8, 2009

EXCERPT:

 
 

 

 

 

 

QUESTION: Can we go to Honduras or —

MR. KELLY: Honduras, sure.

QUESTION: It seems by the reports that the Organizational States presence there is not getting any results by the moment. I don’t know if you have more updates. And also —

MR. KELLY: Well —

QUESTION: — it seems, I don’t know, to me – and also I was reading some reports in so many countries of Latin America that the – it’s surprising that you have there in that meeting the secretary of the hemisphere – acting secretary of the hemisphere Thomas Shannon?

MR. KELLY: Assistant Secretary.

QUESTION: Assistant Secretary. And Micheletti is also keeping his word of not changing nothing. So it’s a very strange situation. What’s going on? He doesn’t want to sign the San Jose.

MR. KELLY: Right.

QUESTION: And they go there with this mission of – very high-profile —

MR. KELLY: Right.

QUESTION: — five minister of external relations of five countries – Canada, the U.S. – and he’s still maintaining that position. What’s —

MR. KELLY: Yeah. Well, actually, I would take issue with your characterization. I understand that there was a positive tone in the meetings, that there was a meeting – I think for the first time – a meeting mediated by the OAS ministers between the two sides. And I think that’s important. I think it’s important that they’ve initiated a direct dialogue.

And the ministers will leave, or perhaps have already left, but they’re leaving behind an OAS secretariat to continue to help facilitate this direct dialogue. And I think that’s important that they’re able to establish this face-to-face meeting between the two sides. So I don’t want to raise expectations too high here or anything, but I think it was a little more productive than you seem to characterize it.

QUESTION: I’m sorry, go ahead.

QUESTION: I just wanted to make a follow-up. Are you aware of a proposal to bring government junta to Honduras, try to solve the political crisis there? Are you aware of that?

MR. KELLY: I’m not aware of that. The main thing for us is that the two sides break this impasse, and by this direct meeting, we have some hope that maybe they are moving towards this. But the main thing is for them both to agree with the facilitation of the OAS to some kind of lasting solution to this crisis. I mean, the people of Honduras deserve nothing less.

QUESTION: And Mr. Crowley said yesterday that Venezuela needs to cooperate in a more constructive way in the region. What did he mean by that? It was regarding Honduras, or could you be more specific?

MR. KELLY: (Laughter.) I agree with my boss that Honduras needs to play a constructive role. We’re calling on all the countries in the region to play a —

QUESTION: Venezuela.

QUESTION: Not Honduras.

QUESTION: Venezuela.

QUESTION: Venezuela.

MR. KELLY: Venezuela.

QUESTION: Okay.

MR. KELLY: That Venezuela needs to play a constructive role. This is an important crisis that we need to resolve, that the – I think the region is moving in a good direction, in moving towards a more inclusive and democratic political system in these countries. And we would hope that Venezuela would play a more productive role.

I’ll take —

QUESTION: Just on Honduras or —

MR. KELLY: Oh, in general, but also in Honduras. And I’m going to take one more question, because we have Assistant Secretary Gordon waiting for us.

QUESTION: Well, what do you see as a productive role?

MR. KELLY: Sorry?

QUESTION: Can you give an example of what do you mean by a more productive role for —

MR. KELLY: For Venezuela, you mean?

QUESTION: Yeah.

MR. KELLY: Well, I think – first of all, I think that they need to open up their own democracy. They need to stop intimidation of media. They need to encourage more debate, more political debate within Venezuela, and play a more productive role in the region. I think that Mr. Crowley mentioned that Venezuela should concentrate more on its – in its region and not pay so much attention to what’s going on in Iran and other countries.

Last question to Jill. Go ahead.

QUESTION: Ian, this has been dragging on for so long. Why are we not to draw the conclusion that it’s dragging on because the U.S. won’t do anything – really do anything about this because there is significant support for the members of the coup, business connections with the United States, conservative organizations that support the coup that do not like Zelaya. So why are we not supposed to, you know, draw some conclusion that it’s simply foot-dragging on the part of this Administration?

MR. KELLY: Boy, I don’t see this Administration as dragging its feet at all. I mean, we have had a very consistent principle here of supporting the idea of a democratic and constitutional order, that you had a coup where the democratically elected leader was (inaudible). But in the final analysis, this is not about us. This is really about (inaudible) of us supporting a multilateral process, of supporting the OAS in its efforts to try and facilitate a solution.

Thank you.

(The briefing was concluded at 2:05 p.m.)

DPB # 172

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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One Comment
  1. October 9, 2009 2:33 PM

    Reporters have twice asked similar questions in previous press briefings. On September 3rd, a reporter (Elise) asked PJ Crowley:

    QUESTION: — you’re sending a mixed message, because on one hand, yes, you’re suspending aid. You’re not definitively calling it a military coup. And this – and he charges that this Micheletti government is not taking you seriously, is not kind of respecting your will that if you were to be declarative about what you think this is, that you would – he would have a better leg to stand on.

    And sometime in July, I forget when, a reporter said that it sounded as if State was justifying the coup.

    While I would much rather that they would just jeer the spokesmen off the stage for the increasingly transparent lies, for reporters to ask these questions are significant events. At some point, I think they are going to turn on State and tear it to pieces.

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